Christian Food Movement: an interview with Nurya Love Parish

by Cherice Bock and Nurya Love Parish

In 2014, Rev. Nurya Love Parish began organizing a network she called the Christian Food Movement, and started a farm-based ministry called Plainsong Farm in Michigan. A former Unitarian Universalist and now Episcopal priest, Parish preached on ecology, food, and faith as far back as 2002, but her vision for putting the themes of faith and ecology together in her life and ministry began to coalesce in 2014 when she encountered Fred Bahnson’s Soil & Sacrament: A Spiritual Memoir of Food and Faith, which led her to Wake Forest School of Divinity’s Food, Faith, & Religious Leadership Initiative. There, she heard about watershed discipleship, and hatched the idea for catalyzing a Christian Food Movement that connects Christians who are integrating food and faith, in the style of the Jewish Food Movement. Read More

Choosing #DayOne

by Craig Stewart
Originally appeared in The Warehouse newsletter

I didn’t come to public activism easily or naturally. In August of 1989 Archbishop Tutu and Rev Boesak led a series of beach protests in Cape Town to highlight the racial segregation of South African beaches. The first one was violently broken up by the police and that week I decided I could no longer vacillate on the sidelines and joined the next one on Strand Beach. I had made the choice to turn from apathy to anger and action.  A few weeks later, on September 2, 1989, a police water cannon loaded with purple dye aimed and fired on thousands of protesters in the city centre. This ‘purple rain’ covered protesters, cars and buildings and the police arrested all those drenched in purple, some friends were smuggled out of town to escape. Chaos and violence and fear seemed in control. Read More

Sacred Earth Youth Camp, Vancouver, BC, July 29-August 10

Youth ages “13-25ish” are invited to attend the third annual Sacred Earth Camp, organized by Salal + Cedar, a watershed discipleship community in Vancouver, British Columbia (Coast Salish Territory). Salal + Cedar hopes other watershed discipleship communities will send young people to learn together and build community. Read More

Poetry from a Time of Drought

Today we feature three poems by Julia Baker, which were written during the long-lasting California drought from 2012–2017.

Eden’s Drought

I had forgotten the music of water touching earth.
My tears have been the only rain.

Drought is slow death, shroud of smoky sin
keening between the mountains.

“In the red,” they say:
“Air unfit to breathe”

Bodies are made for the taking in,
Valley lungs are dust. Read More

Elaine Enns & Ched Myers teaching at Ghost Ranch retreat on watershed discipleship June 24-30

Join Elaine Enns and Ched Myers at Ghost Ranch June 24-30 for a retreat called “Signs of the Times — Watershed Discipleship and Restorative Justice: Mapping Bloodlines, Landlines, and Songlines.”

Ghost Ranch is a beautiful education and retreat center in New Mexico, an excellent location in which to rest, explore, and learn together with others. Read More

Grounding: Ecology, Faith, Hope conference in Ontario, May 25-26

Watershed discipleship artist and theologian Bob Haverluck will be the artist-in-residence and keynote speaker at the upcoming conference Grounding: Ecology, Faith, Hope in Bracebridge, Ontario May 25-26, 2018, at Bracebridge United Church. All are invited to attend. This conference follows the Muskoka Summit on the Environment (May 24-25). You can attend both (total $200), or one or the other. (See below for examples of Bob’s art.) Read More

Reflection on the Bartimaeus Kinsler Institute 2018

Editor’s Note: Luke Winslow attended the Bartimaeus Kinsler Institute in January, entitled “Digging In: Heels, Histories, Hearts.” You can read other reflections from the Institute here.

by Luke Winslow
Guest Contributor

It felt like the Puget Sound hadn’t seen the sun since November. It might’ve come out for a few minutes here and there this winter, but my curiosity in visiting a completely different bioregion for the Bartimeus Kinsler Institute was matched by a readiness for immediate sunburns the moment I arrived in Southern California. I’m grateful for the flexibility of an academic schedule—a few months away from finishing my master’s work at The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology—to have this weeklong Institute nicely timed with spring break. Driving through occupied Duwamish, Puyallup, Nisqually, and others’ territory to leave my adopted watershed after an Ash Wednesday service, I felt a twinge of vulnerability. Read More

Watershed Discipleship topic of Baptist Alliance in April 2018

Those in or near the area of Dayton, Ohio may be interested in joining the Baptist Alliance annual conference this year, focused around the theme “Earth: Beloved Community” (April 26-29, 2018). Read More

‘A Seat at What Table?’

Vice Moderator of Presbyterians For Earth Care, Sue Smith, challenges the church’s position when it comes to investment and climate change. In a recent reflection called “A Seat at What Table?” she writes: Read More

Challenging a Theology of Waste, or “On Dealing with Our Crap,” part 2

by Sarah Thompson and Cherice Bock

In a recent post, Sarah Thompson shared about her understanding of the theology of waste that grips much of the church in the United States: a theology that sees this world, its people, and its resources as disposable, and that has a hard time dealing with physical and emotional crap (waste, trauma, colonialism, racism, etc.). Thompson connects the idea of learning to deal with our physical waste with learning to deal with our emotional and spiritual waste. In this week’s post, she discusses what challenges to this theology of waste look like in environmental activism. We particularly discussed her recent work as the director of Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT), and we also discussed the work required of white environmentalists in order to deal with the theology of waste spread by the combination of Christianity and Western imperialism.

CB: How do you think Christians can actively challenge the theology of waste you’re outlining? I know you recently worked for CPT, so I would love to hear more about how you see their work relating to helping people deal with their crap. Read More